Sunday School Tools


I got a promotion at the church over the summer. I used to teach Sunday School to the Kindergarten and first graders. Now I’m teaching the fourth and fifth graders. I have a couple of Sundays under my belt, but I can’t say whether the experience is better or worse. It’s just different.

I do have more homework teaching the older kids. I didn’t follow the complete lesson plan for the younger ones. It was my experience they could handle one activity a week and we spent the rest of the time having our snack or playing with the toys. This past week, not only did I finish up all the activities, but we had something like twenty minutes left in the class. We ended up talking for awhile then doing a drawing project. I’m still getting used to the maturity level. I generally had my bluffs called in the younger class. I don’t think I fooled anyone into thinking the “additional lesson plan” was anything but an audible. Still, no one called me on it and things went pretty smoothly.

This year’s curriculum is called “Toolbox of our Faith”. The first class we hung up a poster of a toolbox and every week we’ve added a new “tool”. This past Sunday, we added a “moral compass”.

“A compass isn’t a tool,” said one of the boys. “Besides, you wouldn’t put a compass in a toolbox. It would get smashed by the hammers.” So far, our toolbox has a magnifying glass and a ruler to go along with the compass. One could argue that none of those things would be found in your average Craftsman box. I explained the coursework uses the toolbox as a metaphor, albeit not a very good one. It’s not meant to be an actual toolbox, but rather expressions of our beliefs in church that can be made into a nice poster.

The older kids have heard of metaphors and they’ve been around long enough to know that almost anything even remotely educational can be put on a poster somehow. Again, they let me slide.

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